Culture of
Medical Education


Medical Education at the Turn of the Millennium
- Objects and Images that Define our Culture


A World-wide Effort to Explore
the Professional and Organizational Culture of Medical Education

ExhibitIon Goals


  • To raise awareness about the objects and images that embody the culture of medical education


  • To provide participants with an opportunity to reflect on their own involvement in the field

  • To open up a dialog about medical education culture.


Exhibition Committee (in sequence of joining the project):

E Krajic Kachur, Medical Education Development, USA; MJ Yedidia, New York University, USA; EV Aboim Silva, Instituto de Pos-Graduacao Medica Carlos Chagas Castelo, Brazil; E Lesser Bruun, formerly New York University, USA; M Lischka, University of Vienna, Austria; AP Kent, Ottawa in Africa, South Africa; JH Shatzer, Johns Hopkins University, USA; JH Baron, Imperial College School of Medicine, United Kingdom; L Altshuler, Maimonides Medical Center, USA; M Aylward, New York University, USA; N Ban, Nagoya University Hospital, Japan; P Schofield, University of Newcastle, Australia; T Pagan Raggio, City University of New York Medical School, USA; EN Kwizera, University of Transkai, South Africa; A Hilfer, Maimonides Medical Center, USA; H Kedar, Hebrew University, Israel.


Exhibition Venues:

Ottawa in Africa Conference, Cape Town, South Africa; March, 2000

Northeast Group on Educational Affairs (AAMC) Annual Meeting, Hanover, NH, USA; June 2000

Exhibition Report Venues:

Congress 2000: A Continuing Medical Education Summit, Universal City, CA, USA; April 2000

Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Annual Meeting, Beer Sheva, Israel; August, 2000

Lenders to the Exhibition
(alphabetical order):

N Ban, Nagoya University Hospital, Japan; JH Baron, Imperial College School of Medicine, United Kingdom; M DeLaCruz, NYU/Gouverneur Diagnostic & Treatment Center, USA; L DeLong, New York University, USA; K Hanley, NYU/Gouverneur Diagnostic & Treatment Center, USA; H Kedar, Hebrew University, Israel; AP Kent, Ottawa in Africa, South Africa; E Krajic Kachur, Medical Education Development, USA; EN Kwizera, University of Transkai, South Africa; M Levin, Anatomy of Anatomy, USA; C Lord, Kean University, USA; T Pagan Raggio, City University of New York Medical School, USA; J Thomas, New York University, USA; O Winding, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Project Description:

As medical education is undergoing an extensive transformation worldwide, it is critical to reflect on its culture. This will help us better identify opportunities for progress as well as barriers to improvement. Culture consists of the manners, customs and values held by a given society or organizational entity. Many of these are expressed in images and objects that are commonly used. Thus a survey of artifacts can provide some clues about the basic assumptions that are at the core of a social or professional group.

This exhibit explores the organizational culture of medical education and represents the center piece of a three-phase project. Phase I, which has been completed, consisted of surveying individuals in the field (i.e., faculty, trainees, educators, administrators) about the objects and/or images that surround them on a daily basis and thus symbolize for them the field of medical education. Seventy-three individuals from over ten countries contributed 249 items, ranging from "stethoscope" to "computer." Since some were duplicates, the list could be collapsed to about 120 different objects or images. With the assistance of the international and interdisciplinary panel listed above, items were selected and prepared for presentation as an interactive exhibition, which represents Phase II.

The objects and images are accompanied by labels that further detail background and meaning. Viewers are invited to reflect on their own involvement in the field, list aditional objects that should be included in further exhibits, share their own artifacts by displaying them on a specially assigend table, and record their reactions and insights on a video or audio tape which is used at subsequent installations. By exposing the exhibit to as many different viewers as possible around the world, and by gaining their input, it will gradually grow into a true representation of today's medical education culture.

The exhibit has been inaugurated at the 9th Ottawa Conference in Cape Town, South Africa. After that it travels to various national and international conferences throughout 2000 and 2001. In Phase III, which is expected to occur in 2002, photographs of the objects and images as well as reactions to the multiple exhibits will be posted on the Internet for further world-wide examination and reflection.

 

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